Understanding False Confessions: The History

As with most things, police interview and interrogation tactics have changed over time. While far from perfect, the current methods of interview and interrogation are far from those practiced in the past which were barbaric and abhorrent. To understand where we came from we have to understand where we started. Continue reading Understanding False Confessions: The History

Sunday Travels: Methane in Marrakech

So here we all were, global corporate leaders, diplomats, scientists, activists, and a few people from the best university in the World, discussing how to make the changes we want to see. How to implement these lofty, but achievable, goals as outlined in the Paris agreement broadly, and by each country specifically. Especially in wake of the second largest emitter in the world electing a man who doesn’t believe climate change is real to be President. Continue reading Sunday Travels: Methane in Marrakech

Understanding False Confessions: The Fundamentals

I’m sure that many of us cannot think of why someone would falsely confess to a crime. I mean, if you were in a police interrogation, surely you wouldn’t say that you did something that you did not do. Right? Truly that is what is the conundrum of the whole concept. What drives someone renounce their freedom? Continue reading Understanding False Confessions: The Fundamentals

Revisiting America’s Best Idea: The Public Lands Debate

For over three decades the federal government has been at odds with several western state governments over the control of public lands located within state borders. The debate started in 1976 with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, which codified the federal government’s de-facto management of over 300 million acres of land, leaving the individual states out of the process of managing a great deal of their own land. Continue reading Revisiting America’s Best Idea: The Public Lands Debate